Foto: Natália Zajačiková

Importance of the ethical consumption of porn

Pornography has been around for as long as humans themselves; archeologists and historians alike can tell you the rich, historical background of pornography and its vast changes since 5200 B.C.. From detailed cave sculptures in India to fertility gods and goddesses, we have come a long way from where we started. Nowadays, you can have access to an endless stream of pornographic content, but what does it take to get there? Many of us do not stop to think about where this content is coming from. We are rarely worried about “Who made this?”, or “What they were paid to do this?”. Many believe this is the dream job, and that is payment enough. Sadly, your clicks and desires are not tax-deductible, nor are they paying bills, STI testing or any of the daily needs of any person in this industry. This raises the question, “Is my porn consumption actually important?”. Is this actually an issue in this day and age?

Foto: Natália Zajačiková when we were shooting HooK Ups

The short answer is yes. The ethical consumption of porn is a very important debate thats being sidelined by sheer ignorance. It is a common misconception that the average sex worker working in porn is out there “racking in the money”. In reality, the pay of scenes or other content may not be sufficient; especially if we think about all the life and health maintenance of the job. Income can vary between different factors such as identified gender, physical body, age, race, and ethnicity. The porn industry likes to have a schema for all content, that is what you are often building a career and income on. We see categories of “Teen”, “MILF”, “Interracial”, “Ebony”, “Asian”, “Trans”, etc. these categories give some insight to how porn actors are categorized and even paid. All of these labels contribute to your paycheck, yet, there is another label we assign to those who work in the sex industry which carries the heaviest cost of all, sex worker.

Working in porn is not as easy of a job as many believe, the average career expectancy for a porn actor/actress is roughly 3 years according to Jon Millwar and his 10,000 participant study of porn stars, Deep Inside. In this timeline many sex workers are forced to live double lives, as a result of our society’s fear of sex workers and sex work, porn actors included. Overly conservative politicians and heavy hitting influencers and the newest FOSTA/SESTA legislations are all heavily effecting the daily lives of sex workers. These legislative and fear based campaigns force sex workers into unsafe situations, isolation and even allow sex trafficking to thrive all while promoting the idea that sex workers are in need of saving. The reality is sex workers are in need of some major respect.

Foto: Natália Zajačiková when we were shooting sexualities

Our society’s many attempts to save sex workers only creates and promotes more harm. Why is that you may ask? Well, if we are forcing sex workers into isolation by not offering them safe locations, promotion spaces or lines of connection to other sex workers/industry folxs. This isolation can create settings of sexual coercion, lack of consent and other harmful and traumatizing events. Whereas, in support of ethical companies and porn practices such as discussing scenes before entering set, paying a fair wage and allowing views to see the actors consent we are cultivating not only a better product of pornography but a safer space for both the viewer and the actors.

These negative factors feed into larger issues of discrimination, marginalization, misinformation, and false expectations that surround the daily life of those in the sex industry and even the learning habits of the consumers. This toxic cycle promotes endless amount of misconception on what sex is, which is then reflected in “free” porn. Creating a range of emotions and standards many people truly believe to be right and have this desire to live up to totally fabricated situations. The bodies, fluids, and entire act is performed by professionals who have to befit these oppressive standards when they perform any scene. This may force sex workers into unsafe situations for minimal compensation. Basically, unethical porn hurts you as much as it hurts sex workers.

Consumers can have the biggest impact on the sex industry by simply paying for their porn. However, far too often consumers will watch and enjoy the product of sex work, but never support the sex worker themselves. Very few consumers would be willing to pay a small fee to consume their porn ethically yet have no problems subscribing to services such as premium music services or even the newest gaming character skins. If you think your porn doesn’t “pay for itself” then you haven’t been on the receiving end of ethical porn.

Foto: Natália Zajačiková when we were shooting Sexual Health

There is a revolution for ethical porn that needs consumer support, and this can be done through one simple act, paying for your porn. Paying for your porn sets off a chain reaction that once put in motion will make major improvements in many aspects of both consumers and sex workers working in porn. Ethically sourced porn promotes realistic standards, high production quality and overall better content for the consumer. Ethical porn has the potential to build healthy expectations of one’s sex life and not at the expense of someone else’s underpayment. Many companies such as Sex School Hub, CrashPad, Pink and White Productions, Frolicme, and beyond have taken the time to build empires through a symbiotic relationship between consumers, sex workers, production, and content. If you still are not sold by the sheer impact of your money and support then try checking out some of Sex Schools free content. We offer videos on various topics both on-site and on our YouTube channel. Free content only touches the surface so if you want to experience Sex School for just the day we also offer €5 day passes which connect you with all our sexy and enlightening content. Either way we are in need of your support not only for funding of ethical projects, but to improve the stigma given to sex workers and sex work.